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A Charitable organization is a non-governmental created to carry out charitable activities. The goal of the organization is to implement targeted programs of social support for various categories of the population, promotion of science and education, support of culture and art, health protection and promotion of a healthy lifestyle, environmental protection.

H3. Subtitle

The international classification of non-profit organizations distinguishes charitable organizations into a separate group, which includes:

  • foundations that provide grants (including private, corporate, communal and public);
  • organizations that encourage volunteer activity (including recruiting, training and distributing volunteers);
  • organizations for donation collection, including lotteries.

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Let’s number all the same:

  1. foundations that provide grants (including private, corporate, communal and public);
  2. organizations that encourage volunteer activity (including recruiting, training and distributing volunteers);
  3. organizations for donation collection, including lotteries.
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The origin of organized charity in Europe (including Russia) is usually associated with the activities of monasteries.

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After the baptism of Russia in 996, Prince Vladimir made the charity of the poor an official duty of the priesthood. Tithing was introduced to finance monasteries, churches and hospitals, and they remained responsible to provide aid to the poor for centuries.

In Russia the transition from state charity to private and public charitable societies took place in the middle of the 19th century. Before that the royal permission was required to establish the organisation, which hampered the development of private philanthropy: until 1861, less than a hundred organizations were formed. But in 1861 all issues of private charity were transferred to the Ministry of the Interior.
— Wikipedia

A similar situation developed in other European countries: in England almshouses were operated mainly by monasteries, starting with the decree of the Saxon king Athelstan, dated the same century, to establish such an institution in York (and possibly preceding it); by the middle of the 16th century, there were about 800 almshouses and hospitals in England, but after the dissolution of the monasteries, only a few survived, which were to become secular organizations.

The Great Depression showed the inability of existing charities to cope with an unprecedented decline in the welfare of society. In particular, in the United States, the attempts of the Hoover administration and the first Roosevelt cabinet to solve the problem with the help of the voluntary societies of the previous generation ended in failure, which led to the adoption of the New Deal policy with its massive public works and tax reform designed to redistribute the surplus incomes of the richest segment of the population.